e-Travel Advisory ©


Traveller's Name: test Departure Date: 2018-01-05
Agency: eTT Travel Inc. Return Date: 2030-01-05
Counsellor's Name: Nancy Lombardo Entry Requirements: Passport/Visa Info

Last Updated: 2018-09-17

ACAPULCO


   TRAVEL RISK LEVEL

 
Government SourceRisk Level Rating
AustraliaHigh
CanadaHigh
United KingdomHigh
United StatesHigh
  * Click on country name for more information

    TRAVEL ALERTS (Last 5)   Disaster = Disaster  Warning = Warning  Caution = Caution  Info = Info
No Alerts at this time
  GENERAL SECURITY AND CAUTION ADVICE
Visitors should be aware of their surroundings at all times while travelling throughout the country, even in areas generally considered safe. Crimes, including armed robbery, purse snatching, and pick-pocketing, occur frequently. The arrest and detention rate is low and contributes to high levels of criminality.

If you are the victim of a crime, report it immediately to the Agencia del Ministerio Público nearest to the crime scene. No criminal investigation is possible without a formal complaint to Mexican authorities. You must present photo identification. It is especially important to report the loss or theft of your identification documents (to Mexican authorities and to the Embassy or the nearest consulate of your departing country in Mexico), in order to protect yourself should the documents later be misused.

In various parts of the country, military and federal police forces have been deployed in efforts to combat organized crime and improve security conditions. They maintain a visible presence patrolling the streets, setting up roadblocks and conducting random vehicle checks. Armed clashes between security forces and drug groups are commonplace in certain areas and can occur at any time without warning. Travellers could get caught in the crossfire.

Thefts occur regularly. You should dress down, avoid wearing or carrying expensive jewellery, and carry only small amounts of cash. Keep your luggage secure at all times. In resort areas, leave your passport and valuables in your hotel safe, not in your hotel room or on the beach while you are swimming.

Kidnappings occur frequently in large urban areas. The most common practice involves thieves working in cooperation with, or posing as taxi drivers. The thieves force victims to withdraw money from ABMs with their debit or credit cards in exchange for their release. Kidnappers target both the wealthy and middle class. Foreigners are not specifically targeted.

Be careful accepting food, drinks, invitations or rides from strangers or recent acquaintances. Avoid leaving your food and drinks unattended in bars and restaurants. There have been cases of travellers being robbed or assaulted after being drugged.

Be prepared for the possibility of being approached by persistent time-share representatives on the street, as well as at the airport or on the way to your hotel. Be prepared for common pressure techniques, such as telling potential customers that promotions are only valid for that day and offering free tours, meals, gifts or alcoholic beverages. Before purchasing a time-share, gather as much information as possible, research the properties and even get a legal opinion. If you do decide to buy, be sure to carefully review the contract. Anything not included in the contract will not be honoured. Only provide your credit card if you are certain you wish to make the purchase.

Bus accidents occur frequently due to speeding, poor road conditions, and mountainous terrain. You should travel during daylight hours and on first-class buses only. Take precautions in airports, bus stations, and the Mexico City metro, which are often very crowded and popular areas for pickpockets. Avoid travelling during rush hour. Hitchhiking is not a common practice in Mexico and is not recommended.

Travellers should only use hotel taxis or taxis based at designated stands (sitios). In Mexico City, all government-authorized taxis have licence plates starting with an A or a B. Taxis from designated stands have both the logo of their company and the plate number stamped on the side of the car. Always ask the dispatcher for the driver's name and the taxi's licence plate number, model, and colour. Passengers arriving at Benito Juárez Airport in Mexico City should use airport taxis only, after pre-paying the fare inside the airport. Request to see the driver's official ID.

Participation in political demonstrations by foreigners is prohibited and may result in detention, expulsion, and the denial of future entry into Mexico.

Incidents, roadblocks, and clashes continue to occur in the city of Oaxaca. Beach resorts, such as Puerto Escondido and Huatulco, have not been affected by these events.

Warnings on swimming conditions posted on beaches should be taken seriously. Many beaches are not supervised or do not offer warnings. When in doubt, consult the hotel staff.

You should ensure the recreational activities you choose are covered by your travel insurance or by a local insurance policy. Ensure sporting and aquatic equipment is safe and in good condition, especially for scuba diving. Many operators do not conduct regular safety checks. There have been cases of travellers who have been involved in accidents where operators demanded compensation in excess of the value of the damage caused to the vehicle or equipment.

Exercise caution when standing close to balcony railings, as deaths and injuries have resulted from falls. Height standards for balcony railings in Mexico can be considerably lower than in other countries.

Road conditions vary and can be poor in some areas. Dangerous curves, poorly marked signs and construction sites, roaming livestock, slow-moving or abandoned vehicles, and other obstacles pose hazards. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours throughout the country.

Toll (cuota) highways should be used whenever possible, rather than less secure free (libre) roads, where armed robberies and carjacking are more frequent. Overnight stops should be made only in major centres, at reputable hotels or secure campsites.

Mexican styles of driving and road safety standards are very different from those in other countries. Police do not regularly patrol the highways. Be prepared for vehicles that fail to observe speed limits or indicate lane changes, and that do not stop at red lights. Pedestrians should be extremely cautious at all times. Fatal hit-and-run accidents occur. Keep your car doors locked and the windows rolled up, especially at traffic lights, where you can be a target for criminals. For emergency services, dial 060 or 066.

In the event of a vehicle breakdown or roadside emergency, a highway patrol service offered by the Mexican Ministry of Tourism (SECTUR) called the Green Angels (Angeles Verdes) provides free assistance on all major toll highways from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. In case of an emergency, dial 078 or the toll-free number in Mexico, 01-800-006-8839.

The police sometimes ask foreigners to show identification and proof of their legal status in Mexico. You should always carry valid photo identification and photocopies of the identification page of your passport, visa, and other documents, and keep the originals in a safe place. It is also recommended that you leave a certified copy of your vehicle registration with relatives or friends in your home country.

Automobile insurance purchased in your certain countries my not be recognized in Mexico. In that case, you must obtain additional insurance at the Mexican border. Full coverage is recommended, including coverage for legal assistance. Automobile insurance is much more expensive in Mexico than in most countries. Many local drivers do not have any form of car insurance.

For more information on Mexican driver's permits, vehicle inspection, road tax, or mandatory insurance, please contact the Mexican Ministry of Tourism (SECTUR) at 1-866-640-0597.

In case of an accident or theft of the vehicle, a police report should immediately be obtained from the nearest police station (Ministerio Público) and presented to the Mexico City customs office (Aduanas) in order to cancel the temporary imporation permit no later than five days after the incident. Travellers involved in traffic accidents may face serious legal problems, including imprisonment. They could be taken into custody until responsibility for the accident is determined and until all penalties are paid. If you do not have Mexican liability insurance, you could be prevented from leaving the country until all parties agree that adequate financial satisfaction has been received. Depending on the extent of injuries or damages, drivers may face criminal charges. Motor vehicle insurance is considered invalid in Mexico if the driver is found to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the accident, or if the driver has no valid driver's licence.

Mexico has very strict rules regarding the entry of foreign motor vehicles. Do not enter Mexico without having obtained the proper vehicle permit and car insurance. Travellers without a permit may be fined and have their vehicle seized.

Some travellers have reported getting sick or even blacking out after drinking alcohol in some resort locations, as alcohol served may be unregulated. While Mexican authorities have put mechanisms in place in an attempt to control unregulated alcohol, counterfeit alcohol could still be served in bars, restaurants and resorts. Be cautious if you choose to drink alcohol and seek medical assistance if you begin to feel sick.

For more travel risk ratings, go to http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/map-mexico-statebystate/

For security and safety reasons, it is recommended that the travelling public refrain from making statements while on board an aircraft that could be considered threat or safety related. Airlines have the right to remove passengers on a flight deemed to be security risks. If the aircraft is required to make an emergency landing in a non-destined country due to a security situation involving passengers, they may be removed from the aircraft by law enforcement officials and charged or fined.

To access critical airline risk information, including significant airline safety events by airlines, please visit:
http://www.airsafe.com/

For general traveller security tips, please visit:
http://www.etraveladvisories.com/p_safety.html

For public holiday dates, visit:
http://www.worldtravelguide.net/public-holidays
http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays
http://www.qppstudio.net/publicholidays.htm

For the world's best festivals, visit:
https://www.fest300.com/festivals

Travelling with Mobile Devices: Best Practices & Trends, visit:
http://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=17989
  ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
CANADIAN CITIZENS including those with dual citizenship, are required to present a valid passport which should be valid at least three months beyond date of intended stay in order to enter and exit Mexico. Canadians without a valid passport will be refused entry and returned to Canada.

Canadians with a criminal record might be refused entry and returned to Canada on the next available flight. Canadians in this situation should contact the Embassy of Mexico in Ottawa prior to making travel arrangements.

Permanent residents and landed immigrants of Canada should check for specific entry requirements with Mexico’s immigration authorities (Instituto Nacional de Migración, or INAMI).

Persons seeking to enter Mexico for purposes other than tourism are required to have a proper visa. Foreigners involved in unauthorized activities will be expelled. Special and diplomatic passport holders require a visa to visit Mexico. Consult the Embassy of Mexico in Canada or its consulates for more information.

Tourist card (Multiple Migratory Form for Foreigners (FMM) provided by airlines or at points of entry): Required
Business visa (FMM): Required
Work visa: Required
Student visa: Required

Tourist Card
Canadian tourists do not require a visa or a tourist card for stays of 72 hours or less within the border zone (20 to 30 kilometres from the U.S. border). For travel to Mexico beyond the border zone, Canadians must be in possession of a tourist card, also called Multiple Migratory Form for Foreigners (FMM). This document is provided by airlines or by immigration authorities at the country’s points of entry. If you enter Mexico by land, it is your responsibility to stop at the immigration facility located at the border.

In order to obtain a tourist card, Canadians are required to present a valid passport.

Authorities can demand to see your tourist card at any time. You must therefore carry the original or a copy at all times, and surrender the original when leaving Mexico. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine and/or expulsion.

Your tourist card will be stamped on arrival. If travelling by bus or car, ensure you obtain a tourist card and have it stamped by immigration authorities at the border. If you do not receive a stamped tourist card at the border, ensure that upon arrival at your destination within Mexico, you immediately go to the closest INAMI office, present your bus ticket, and request a tourist card. Travellers who fail to have their tourist card stamped may be fined, detained, or expelled from the country.

An immigration official will determine the number of days you can remain in Mexico. Do not assume that you will be granted the full 180 days. An extension of your stay can be requested for a fee at the INAMI or its local offices.

Tourism Tax
Mexican authorities impose a tourism tax (approximately US$20) for visitors to Mexico. This fee is normally included in airline ticket prices. Visitors arriving by road (car or bus) or sea will be asked to pay this fee at any bank in Mexico (there is a bank representative at every port of entry). The bank receipt must be attached to the tourist card for submission at departure. Visitors entering by land for tourism purposes only are exempt if their stay does not exceed seven days. Visitors to the northern border zone (20 to 30 kilometres from the U.S. border) and those going to Mexico on cruise ships are exempt.

Work Visa
Persons entering Mexico for purposes other than tourism are required to have a proper visa. Foreigners involved in unauthorized activities will be expelled.

It is recommended that you apply for your visa yourself. However, if a prospective employer is processing your business (or work) visa for you, ensure that you receive copies of all correspondence between the employer and Mexican immigration authorities, and that these copies are stamped by the immigration authorities as proof that your papers are indeed being processed. You should also request a receipt from your employer for any documents (your Canadian passport, for example) that you provide for purposes of obtaining the visa. It is not recommended that your employer keep your passport for you.

Customs
Tourists are allowed to bring in their personal effects duty-free. Failure to declare personal effects will result in their confiscation and a fine. Mexican customs provides information in English regarding entry into Mexico by air or land. Travellers carrying more than US$10,000 or its equivalent in other currencies, cash, cheques, money orders, or any other monetary instrument must declare the amount exceeding US$10,000. Failure to make this declaration is against Mexican law and often results in detention.

Canadians wishing to donate goods should contact the Embassy of Mexico in Canada before sending or importing goods to Mexico in order to fulfill the importation permit requirements.

Dual Citizenship
Mexico recognizes dual citizenship for persons born in Mexico or abroad to Mexican parents. Under Mexican law, dual citizens entering and departing from Mexico must identify themselves as Mexican citizens. Travellers possessing both Mexican and Canadian citizenship must carry valid travel documents of both countries. Dual citizenship status could hamper efforts of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada to provide you with consular assistance.

Any adult travelling with children may be required to show evidence of parental/custodial and/or access rights. Foreign and Canadian authorities may also require evidence that the adult has the consent of the parents, legal guardian, and/or the court to travel with the children. Some countries or regions may not permit children to enter or, in some cases, leave the country or region without proper documentation such as a letter of consent or a court order.

All visitors must hold a return/onward ticket, all documents required for their next destination; and sufficient funds to cover their stay in Mexico.

Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA)
New entry requirement now in effect: Visa-exempt foreign nationals who fly to or transit through Canada need an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA). Exceptions include U.S. citizens and travellers with a valid Canadian visa. For complete ETA exceptions, visit: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/visas-all.asp#eta-exemptions.

Starting Nov. 10, 2016, Canadian citizens, including dual citizens, will need a valid Canadian passport to board their flight to Canada. All visa-exempt travellers (except U.S. citizens) will need an eTA to board their flight. For more information, visit: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/eta.asp

Minors travelling alone may require a passport, visa, where applicable, and other travel documentation in order to travel abroad. Check with Embassy or Consulate for required documentation.

Be sure to check for transit entry and visa requirements for each transit country that your itinerary takes you through, before arriving at your final destination.

Entry into a country is the sole discretion of the authorities and you may be refused entry even if the required information and travel documentation are complete.

Canadian passports should be in perfect condition. Passports that are ripped, torn, missing corners, water damage to cover and inside pages, or stained, may not be accepted by the airline carrier or Immigration. You could be denied boarding by the airline and refused entry into a country by Immigration officials. You should therefore apply for a new passport, prior to travel.

Most countries require that you have adequate un-used pages in your passport, allowing for any necessary stamps upon arrival and departure. If you require a visa for the country that you intend on travelling to, then it is necessary to have un-used pages for the new visa entry. It is recommend that you have two free pages in the Visas section of your passport before any international travel.

It is the sole prerogative of each country to determine who is allowed to enter. All countries have special requirements for persons intending to reside for extended periods (usually more than 90 days) or who plan to work, study, or engage in non-tourist activities. Contact the Embassy or Consulate of the country to be visited. Violations of entry and exit requirements may result in serious penalties.

Although same-sex marriages are legal in Canada, many countries do not recognize them. Attempting to enter as a same-sex married couple may result in refusal by local officials.

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION RECOMMENDATION: Foreign Affairs Canada encourages Canadians who plan to stay in a country for more than 3 months OR if there is political unrest to register with the responsible Canadian government office.
For further information visit:http://travel.gc.ca/assistance/emergency-info/roca-faq

To order or renew your Canadian passport, go to http://www.ppt.gc.ca/index.aspx?lang=e.
Processing times for acquiring a Canadian passport:
•In person at a passport office: 10 business days
•In person at a Service Canada or Canada Post receiving agent: 20 business days
•By mail: 20 business days

Urgent and express services for acquiring a Canadian passport is available, but not at all locations. Check the service location map to find out which passport offices offer express and urgent service.
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/passport/map/map.asp

For urgent or express service, you must apply in person and proof of upcoming travel may be required for express service. Additional fees also apply.
•Urgent pick-up: By the end of the next business day
•Express pick-up: 2 to 9 business days

NON-CANADIAN – It is the responsibility of travelers to ensure that they are in possession of the proper and valid travel documentation and visa requirement to enter/exit each country included in their travel plans. Please visit http://www.iatatravelcentre.com/travelinformation.php or check with the Embassy or Consulate in your country of departure for up-to-date information on passports and visas.

NON-COMPLIANCE WITH ENTRY REQUIREMENTS may result in being refused entry into the country and deportation of passenger on the same aircraft or first available flight. Entry into a country is the sole discretion of the authorities and you may be refused entry even if the required information and travel documentation are complete.
VISA EXPEDITING: For travelers requiring a visa or other travel document on an expedited basis, please visit CIBT s website at: http://www.ca.cibt.com/home.aspx?PortalKey=10152. CIBT provides step­by­step visa instructions, application forms and will hand carry your documents to the closest consulate or embassy for submission.

  HEALTH & MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS & GUIDELINES
Zika Virus Disease

Zika virus is transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito from the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti in tropical regions. This is the same mosquito that transmits dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever.

These mosquitoes bite in the day, particularly around dawn and dusk. The infection often occurs without symptoms but are similar to other arbovirus infections such as dengue, and include fever, skin rashes, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint pain, malaise, and headache. These symptoms are usually mild and last for 2-7 days. There is currently no vaccine to prevent Zika virus and no specific treatment. Illness from Zika is usually not severe and does not require hospitalization.

Prevention Recommendations:
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/index.html

Pregnancy and Zika Virus:
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/question-answers.html

CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women and women trying to become pregnant.
• Pregnant women in any trimester should consider postponing travel to the areas where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. Pregnant women who do travel to one of these areas should talk to their doctor or other healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to avoid mosquito bites during the trip.
• Women trying to become pregnant or who are thinking about becoming pregnant should consult with their healthcare provider before traveling to these areas and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip.

Countries and Territories with Active Zika Virus Transmission:
http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html
http://www.who.int/csr/disease/zika/en/

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that your travel plans include contacting a travel medicine clinic or physician six to eight weeks before departure. Based on your individual risk assessment, a health care professional can determine your need for immunization. and/or preventive medication and advise you on precautions to avoid disease. This is especially important if you plan to travel with infants or young children.

Travellers are reminded to ensure that their routine (childhood) immunizations (e.g., tetanus, diphtheria, polio, and measles) are up to date.

Prescription medication for legitimate health conditions may come under intense scrutiny by foreign officials. In some countries, drugs that are legal and readily available maybe considered illegal, require a prescription, or arouse the suspicions of local officials and customs and immigration authorities. Take appropriate precautions when travelling with such supplies.

Standards of medical care may differ from those in Canada. Treatment may be expensive, and payment in advance may be required. Travellers are advised to arrange for medical insurance prior to departure. Prescription medication should be kept in the original container and packed in carry-on luggage.

Mosquito-borne diseases, including malaria and dengue fever, can be a threat, especially during the rainy season. Although health authorities are actively combating these diseases, travellers should cover up and use mosquito repellent.

Water-borne and food-borne diseases are prevalent. Purify tap water or buy bottled water, and avoid ice cubes. Fruits and vegetables washed in tap water should be disinfected, peeled or cooked. Purchase only reliably pasteurized and refrigerated products. Choose restaurants carefully. Avoid consuming food or beverages sold by street vendors.

Health & Medical
http://etraveladvisories.com/p_health.html

Insect Bites
http://etraveladvisories.com/p_insects.html

Malaria
http://etraveladvisories.com/p_malaria.html

Travelers' Diarrhea
http://etraveladvisories.com/p_diarrhea.html

Food & Water Precautions
http://etraveladvisories.com/p_food.html

For more health information, please visit:

U.S. - Centre of Disease Control & Prevention:
http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/

U.S - Pan American Health Organization:
http://new.paho.org/hq/index.php?lang=en

World Health Organization:
http://www.who.int/csr/don/en/index.html

Canada - Public Heath Agency of Canada:
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/tmp-pmv/index-eng.php

United Kingdom Health Protection Agency:
http://www.hpa.org.uk/Topics/

National Travel Health Network:
http://www.nathnac.org/

European Centre for Disease Prevention & Control: http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/Pages/home.aspx

MOBILE APPS
TravWell - Helps you plan for safe and healthy international travel: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/apps-about

Can I Eat This? - Help prevent travelers’ diarrhea. Select the country you’re in and answer a few simple questions about what you’re thinking about eating or drinking, and Can I Eat This? app will tell you whether it’s likely to be safe:
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/apps-about

CDC Yellow Book 2018 - A useful reference which advises international travelers about health risks:
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/apps-about

  CUSTOMS IMPORT: DUTY FREE IMPORT
Visitors may import: 2 cartons of cigarettes or 50 cigars or 250g of pipe tobacco, up to 3 litres of wine or liquor, a reasonable quantity of perfume and eau-de-cologne for personal use, and goods up to the value of US$300. Tobacco and liquor allowances are only for persons over 18 years of age.
  EMBASSIES/CONSULATES
MEXICO CITY, Embassy of Canada
Calle Schiller No. 529, Colonia Polanco, 11580 México, D.F., México
P.O. Box 40-045, 06141 México, D.F., México
Tel: 52 (55) 5724-7900
Fax: 52 (55) 5724-7943
Email: mxico@international.gc.ca
Internet: http://www.mexico.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico

Consular district:
Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Estado de Mexico, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Morelos, Mexico City, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luís Potosí, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Zacatecas

ACAPULCO - Consular Agency of Canada
Pasaje Diana, Avenida Costera Miguel Alemán 121, L-16, Fracc. Magallanes, 39670 Acapulco, Guerrero, México
Tel: 52 (744) 484-1305 / 52 (744) 481-1349
Fax: 52 (744) 484-1306
Email: aplco@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Guerrero, Michoacán
Other social media:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmbCanMexico
Facebook: Embajada de Canadá en México

CABO SAN LUCAS- Consular Agency of Canada
Carretera Transpeninsular Km. 0.5, Local 82, Col. El Tezal, 23454 Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, México
Tel: 52 (624) 142-4333
Fax: 52 (624) 142-4262
Email: lcabo@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Baja California Sur

CANCUN- Consular Agency of Canada
Centro Empresarial, Oficina E7, Blvd. Kukulcan Km. 12, Zona Hotelera, 77599 Cancún, Quintana Roo, México
Tel: 52 (998) 883-3360 / 52 (998) 883-3361
Fax: 52 (998) 883-3232
Email: cncun@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Campeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo north of the municipality of Solidaridad, including Puerto Morelos, Isla Mujeres and Holbox

GUADALAJARA - Consulate of Canada
World Trade Center, Av. Mariano Otero 1249, Torre Pacifico Piso 8, Col. Rinconada del Bosque, 44530 Guadalajara, Jalisco, México
Tel: 52 (33) 1818 4200
Fax: 52 (33) 1818 4210
Email: gjara@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Embassy of Canada in Mexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Jalisco (except for Puerto Vallarta and coastal region)

MAZATLAN- Consular Agency of Canada
Centro Comercial La Marina Business and Life, Blvd. Marina Mazatlán 2302, Office 41, Col. Marina Mazatlán, 82103 Mazatlán, Sinaloa, Mexico
Tel: 52 (669) 913-7320
Fax: 52 (669) 914-6655
Email: mztln@international.gc.ca
Consular district:
Sinaloa

MONTERREY - Consulate General of Canada
Torre Gomez Morin 955, Ave. Gomez Morin No. 955, Suite 404, Col. Montebello, 66279 San Pedro Garza Garcia, Nuevo Léon, México
Tel: 52 (81) 2088 3200
Fax: 52 (81) 2088 3230
Email: monterrey@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district
Nuevo León

OAXACA - Consular Agency of Canada
Multiplaza Brena, Pino Suárez 700, Local 11 B, Col. Centro, 68000 Oaxaca, Oaxaca, México
Tel: 52 (951) 513-3777 / 52 (951) 503-0722
Fax: 52 (951) 515-2147
Email:
oxaca@international.gc.ca
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Chiapas, Oaxaca

PLAYA DEL CARMEN - Consular Agency of Canada
Plaza Paraíso Caribe, Modulo C, Planta 2, Oficina C21 - 24, Av. 10 Sur entre Calle 3 y 5 Sur, M-35, Lote 1, Colonia Centro, 77710 Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, México
Tel: 52 (984) 803-2411
Fax: 52 (984) 803-2665
Email:
crmen@international.gc.ca
Consular district
From Playa del Carmen (including the municipality of Solidaridad) to Chetumal, including Cozumel, in the state of Quintana Roo

PUERTO VALLARTA - Consular Agency of Canada
Street Address
Plaza Peninsula, Local Sub F, Boulevard Francisco Medina Ascencio 2485, Zona Hotelera Norte, 48300 Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, México
Telephone
52 (322) 293-0098 / 52 (322) 293-0099
Fax: 52 (322) 293-2894
Email:
pvrta@international.gc.ca
Consular district:
Coast of Jalisco, including Puerto Vallarta, and states of Colima and Nayarit

TIJUANA - Consulate of Canada
Germán Gedovius No.10411-101, Condominio del Parque, Zona Río, 22320 Tijuana, Baja California Norte, México
Tel: 52 (664) 684-0461
Fax: 52 (664) 684-0301
Email:tjuna@international.gc.ca
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/CanadainMexico
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CanEmbMexico
Consular district:
Baja California, Sonora

Toll-free emergency numbers
The following toll-free numbers can be dialed from anywhere within the country of Mexico, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

To reach the Embassy of Canada in Mexico City: 01-800-706-2900
Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa: 001-800-514-0129.

When making long-distance calls within Mexico, callers must dial 01, the area code, and the number; when calling internationally from Mexico to Canada or the United States, you must dial 001, the area code, and the number.

If you wish to register your visit or require government assistance in this country, visit: http://www.embassyworld.com/embassy/
  LOCAL CONTACT
Embassy of United Mexico States,
Ottawa, ON
tel: (613) 233-8988
fax: (613)235-9123
http://www.sre.gob.mx/canada/

Mexican Consulate offices:
Toronto, tel: (416) 368-2875,
Montreal, tel: (514) 288-2502,
Vancouver, tel: (604) 684-1859,

Mexico Tourism Board offices:
Toronto, tel: (416) 925-0704
Montreal, tel: (514) 871-1052
Vancouver, tel:(604) 669-2845

Mexico Tourism 1-800-44-MEXICO
http://visitmexico.com
http://mexico-travel.com
  LOCAL LAWS CUSTOMS AND RESTRICTIONS
As a visitor to any country you are not exempt from its laws, both civil and criminal and you cannot expect to receive special treatment. Your dress, general behaviour and appearance may have to conform to local standards. You are subject to local laws. A serious violation may lead to a jail sentence. The sentence will be served in local prisons.

It is illegal to drink alcoholic beverages in non-designated public areas. The minimum age at which people are legally allowed to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages is 18 years old.

Participation in political activities (such as demonstrations) by foreigners is prohibited and should be avoided, as it may result in detention, deportation or the denial of future entry into Mexico.

It is illegal to possess archaeological artefacts or to export such items from Mexico.

Canadians may acquire real estate in Mexico. However, you should consult a lawyer, as real estate transactions, laws and practices can be complex and differ considerably from those in Canada. Canadians should research potential property purchases carefully, as irregularities occur. The most frequent irregularities include title challenges, which may result in litigation and possible eviction. Mexican real estate agents are not licensed or regulated.

Before purchasing a time-share, gather as much information as possible, research the properties and even get a legal opinion. If you do decide to buy, be sure to carefully review the contract. Anything not included in the contract will not be honoured.

As a visitor to any country you are not exempt from its laws, both civil and criminal and you cannot expect to receive special treatment. Your dress, general behaviour and appearance may have to conform to local standards.

Living standards and practices in each country and the standards and conditions with respect to the provision of utilities, services, religion, sanitary conditions, local practices,
political system and accommodation may differ from those found in your home country.
  CALLING CANADA
When making long-distance calls within Mexico, callers have to dial 01, the area code and the number; when calling internationally from Mexico to Canada or the United States, you must dial 001, the area code and the number; all other international calls from Mexico must be dialled with 00; when calling internationally to Mexico, the country code is 52.

  CHARACTERISTICS
One of the world's most dazzling resorts, located 418 km south of Mexico City on the Pacific Coast in the State of Guerrero, Acapulco is built in a magnificent setting where the mountains meet the sea. It offers over 300 hotels to fit everybody's budget. Thanks to its dazzling discos, bars, clubs and restaurants, Acapulco is the largest and most vibrant resort in Mexico.
  MAJOR AIRPORTS
Juan N. Alvarez Airport is 20 km south of the city.

The Mexican airport departure/tourism tax differs per airport and ranges from USD$18-$29 per person. Payment payable at airport of departure in Mexico but it may be already included in airline ticket.

For more airport information and to view a map, visit: http://www.airport-acapulco.com/

It is recommended that you do not place valuables in your luggage, due to possible theft. Keep valuables in your hand luggage.

For a list of permitted and prohibited items in carry-on baggage and on board an aircraft visit:

http://www.catsa-acsta.gc.ca/english/travel_voyage/list.shtml

http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/standards/commerce-dangerousgoods-regoverview-passlugg-menu-1574.htm

A free app for quick access to 180 Airport Wi-Fi’s, is available in your App Store at:
http://getflio.com/#/tour

Travellers should arrive at the airport earlier than usual, exercise patience and contact their airline for further information on their flight(s).

AIRPORT SECURITY
For more information on security directives issued by the Transportation Security Administration to all United States and international air carriers with inbound flights to the U.S. and other travel security news, visit: http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/index.shtm

  CLIMATE
Expect beach weather all year with an average temperature of 27C. Humidity can be intense in the summer. Tropical storms and rain showers are most prevalent in the summer and fall.


 January   Min. 21   Max. 29 
 February   Min. 21   Max. 31 
 March   Min. 21   Max. 31 
 April   Min. 22   Max. 31 
  CURRENCY
Nuevo Peso (N$). Old pesos are still in circulation. To calculate the value of old pesos, drop three zeros, ie. a 50,000 peso bill is worth 50 new pesos. Count change carefully to be sure you have not counted old bills or coins as if they were new ones. Credit cards are widely used throughout Mexico. Be vigilant when using bank or credit cards. Bank and credit card information has been copied by unscrupulous vendors by swiping cards twice for purchases. If possible, ask to swipe your own card. If this is not possible, ensure that it is only run through once. Make sure you obtain your copy of the transaction slip.
The import and export of local currency is limited to the equivalent of US$10,000. Higher amounts must be declared. Foreign currency must be declared on arrival. Unused amounts previously declared upon arrival may be exported.
In order to regulate the quantity of dollars entering the Mexican banking system, the Mexican government has capped the amount of dollars foreigners can exchange for pesos in Banks & Money Exchange establishments to no more than US$1,500 per month and per person.
The measure will not affect purchases made with credit cards or debit cards in Mexico. The measure will not affect the amount of cash (in Mexican pesos) an international tourist can withdraw from an ATM machine on a daily or monthly basis. It is recommended that all travelers bring Mexican pesos as well as their credit and/or debit cards to minimize any inconvenience the exchange cap at banks may cause.

For information on currency conversion and trends, visit: http://www.oanda.com/ .

Visa ATM Locator;
http://visa.via.infonow.net/locator/global/jsp/SearchPage.jsp

Mastercard ATM Locator;
http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/cardholderservices/atmlocations/index.html
  ELECTRICITY
110 volts, the same as in Canada.
  PUBLIC HOLIDAYS
For public holiday dates, visit:
http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/mexico/2015
  DRIVING AND REGULATIONS
In case of an accident or theft of your vehicle, you should immediately obtain a police report from the nearest police station (Ministerio Público) and present it to the Mexico City customs office (Aduanas) in order to cancel the Temporary Vehicle Importation Permit no later than five days after the incident. If you are involved in a traffic accident, you may face serious legal problems, including imprisonment. You could be taken into custody until responsibility for the accident is determined and all penalties are paid. If you do not have Mexican liability insurance, you could be prevented from leaving the country until all parties agree that adequate financial satisfaction has been received. Depending on the extent of injuries or damages, drivers may face criminal charges. Motor vehicle insurance is considered invalid in Mexico if the driver is found to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the accident, or if the driver has no valid driver's licence.

If you receive a fine for a driving infraction in certain parts of the country, the issuing police officer is obligated by law to retain your driver's license or registration until the fine is paid. Expect delays in recovering the document.

Road conditions vary and can be poor in some areas. Dangerous curves, poorly marked signs and construction sites, roaming livestock, slow-moving or abandoned vehicles, and other obstacles pose hazards. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours throughout the country.

Toll (cuota) highways should be used whenever possible, rather than less secure free (libre) roads, where armed robberies and carjackings are more frequent. Overnight stops should be made only in major centres, at reputable hotels or secure campsites.

Mexican styles of driving and road safety standards are very different from those in your country. Police do not regularly patrol the highways. Be prepared for vehicles that fail to observe speed limits or indicate lane changes, and that do not stop at red lights. Pedestrians should be extremely cautious at all times. Fatal hit-and-run accidents occur. Keep your car doors locked and the windows rolled up, especially at traffic lights, where you can be a target for criminals. For emergency services, dial 060 or 066.

In case of a vehicle breakdown or roadside emergency, a highway patrol service offered by the Mexican Ministry of Tourism (SECTUR) called the Green Angels (Angeles Verdes) provides free assistance on all major toll highways from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The telephone number in Mexico City is 3002-6300 ext. 8987 to 8989 (when dialling from outside Mexico City, dial 01 and 55 before the number).

Canadian driver's licences are valid in Mexico. The police sometimes ask foreigners to show identification and proof of their legal status in Mexico. You should always carry valid photo identification and photocopies of the identification page of your passport, visa and other documents, and keep the originals in a safe place.

Canadian automobile insurance is not recognized in Mexico. You must obtain additional insurance at the Mexican border. Full coverage is recommended, including coverage for legal assistance. Automobile insurance is much more expensive in Mexico than in Canada. Many local drivers do not have any form of car insurance.

For an application form to obtain an International Driving Permit, please visit:
http://www.caa.ca/travel-documents/idp/


  CRUISING
For cruise travel safety, health and security tips from the International Council of Cruise Lines, visit http://www.iccl.org/ and
http://www.cruising.org/cruise-industry-safety-tool-kit
  BUSINESS HOURS
BANKING HOURS: Banks are open weekdays, generally from 0900 to 1330. Money can also be exchanged at casas de cambio (currency exchange houses) that are open longer hours and generally offer quicker service.
SHOPPING HOURS: Most shops are open from 1000 until 1300 and again from 1600 until 1900. Visa ATM Locator;
http://visa.via.infonow.net/locator/global/jsp/SearchPage.jsp

Mastercard ATM Locator;
http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/cardholderservices/atmlocations/index.html
  BANKING HOURS
.
  SHOPPING
One of the most popular activities in Acapulco is shopping. Resortwear and sportswear are an Acapulco specialty. Stores also offer a wide selection of Mexico's best handicrafts. Most businesses accept major credit cards.
  FOOD AND BEVERAGE
FOOD: Acapulco restaurants are legendary. You can sample everything from gourmet cuisine to fast foods in every setting imaginable. Seafood is a specialty. Try the meat or corn tamales as well as the sopes (thick tortillas fried to a golden brown and topped with beans and shredded chicken). Thursdays are reserved for the "pozolero", an afternoon feast featuring a hominy and pork stew called pozole.
BEVERAGES: Tequila is the national drink. Mescal is another popular drink as is brandy. Mexican beer is very good.
  TIPPING
It is customary to tip for all small services. Tips in Mexico generally follow the 15% rule. Usually, you are not expected to tip a taxi driver. It is traditional to tip gas station attendants. A 15% tax (IVA) is levied on rooms, food, beverages and most purchases and is often included in the price.
  RE-ENTRY
Upon returning into Canada, you will be required to pass through the Canadian Border Services, also known as Canadian Customs and Immigration.

At this time, you must show the Border Services officer your Canadian Passport or proof of citizenship and a completed declaration card which you received on board the plane. The Border Services officer will ask you questions regarding your trip.

You must declare all goods that you are bringing into Canada. Border Services officer may seize any goods or items that you do not declare or that you falsely declare. Failure to declare could result in penalties, seizure and/or prosecution.

For information on personal exemption limits, importing alcohol and tobacco, restricted, controlled or prohibited items you may/may not bring into Canada visit:
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5056-eng.html
http://www.beaware.gc.ca/english/toce.shtml


  INSURANCE
It is highly recommended that you purchase travel insurance prior to leaving for your trip. Whether you are travelling for a vacation or on business, you should ensure you are adequately covered.

Government and private health plans provide either none or limited coverage while travelling outside of the country. Business health plans are also subject to exclusions and limitations.

Your travel agent can offer you a complete travel insurance package including; medical and hospital, trip cancellation and interruption, and lost baggage.

Some credit cards do offer travel insurance, however they do not always provide adequate coverage. Review and understand the terms of your credit card insurance policy.

Most insurance companies do have exclusions in their coverages. Pre-existing medical conditions are generally not insurable. Any change in medication prior to your travel could also disqualify you from a claim with the insurance company. High risk or extreme sport activities such as skydiving, parachuting, and bungee jumping are also not covered by insurance. If you are currently ill, your doctor should give you an authorization to travel out of the country. Women who are pregnant should consult with their doctor prior to travel. Most travel health policies to not cover woman more than 31 weeks pregnant. Pre-term infants born while travelling are also not covered. Consult with your travel provider to purchase the proper insurance you need.

The Ebola Virus Disease is not covered by most standard health insurance policies. Ensure you have purchased additional insurance to cover special medical care, hospitalization and medical evacuation for Ebola, should you be affected by this virus.

Read and understand the eligibility rules, limitations, exclusions and definitions of the insurance you have, before venturing abroad. Extra travel insurance can always be purchased.
  COPYRIGHT
This TRAVEL ADVISORY information is subject to Copyright by e-Travel Technologies Inc 2014 and has been issued on your behalf by your Travel Professional or a service subscribing to www.eTravelAdvisories.com.